Chris Linkas: Start Investing Early to Live Your Best Life

Youth is a time for absorbing details about the workings of the world. One of the most critical lessons is that of general finance. It is a commonly known fact that saving at a young age and regularly contributing to those savings can help realize true wealth in later years. The reason for this is the concept of compounding: the near-magical phenomenon that demonstrates how a 20 year old can make a sensible $10,000 investment become $70,000 over the course of 40 years at an interest rate of 5%. The same amount deposited at a more traditionally savings focused age of 40 would only yield $26,000 after the same time frame based on exactly the same interest rate.

One expert in the field of investing is Chris Linkas. As an individual with vast knowledge of American commercial real estate investments and the current European Head of Credit, Linkas is well versed in risk management and investment strategies (http://www.spoke.com/people/christopher-linkas-fortress-3e1429c09e597c1006eb4661). He is currently based in London and oversees the workings of 20 individuals in the UK-Euro regions focused on such activities as corporate loans and securities, shipping, renewables, commercial real estate and more (relationshipscience). With the many personalized variables affecting the type of investment for each individual, having an expert with knowledge of such details could prove invaluable.

Getting an individual started young can be challenging. It can be tough to get the majority of 20 year olds or even most 20-somethings to accept the mindset of savings. For many individuals this is a time period in their lives where they need (or feel that they need) everything they earn in order to simply make ends meet. Linkas says it takes extraordinary  self-discipline to begin saving and leave the savings untouched over the course of several decades.

Young investors have the distinct ability of tolerating risk. Older adults, especially those with retirement in their sight, are drawn to low risk investments such as CDs or money markets (reflecting a lower yield). Younger investors have the safety net of many more decades of  potential earnings providing the ability to expand their potential risk and possibly earn a much higher return on their investment, according to Chris Linkas.